Saturday, January 08, 2005

Plasma Television: Product Features (Part 2)

Display Format
The Display Format refers to the type of digital signal that a TV can display. The ATSC, which governs digital TV standards, has designated 18 formats for transmitting digital television. These are the ones that are used most frequently:

480i - This resolution is used by Standard Definition TV (SDTV), and provides a vertical resolution (lines per frame) of 480 interlaced and a horizontal resolution of 704, for a total of 337,920 pixels.

480p - This resolution is used by Enhanced Definition TV (EDTV), and provides a vertical resolution (lines per frame) of 480 progressive and a horizontal resolution of 704, for a total of 337,920 pixels.

720p - This resolution is used by High Definition TV (HDTV), and provides a vertical resolution (lines per frame) of 720 progressive and a horizontal resolution of 1280, for a total of 921,600 pixels.

1080i - This resolution is used by High Definition TV (HDTV), and provides a vertical resolution (lines per frame) of 1080 interlaced and a horizontal resolution of 1920, for a total of 2,073,600 pixels.

Wednesday, January 05, 2005

Plasma Television: Product Features (Part 1)

Below are some common Plasma HDTV terms:

Flat Panel Type
Flat Panel TVs use either LCD or Plasma technology. LCDs (Liquid Crystal Displays) use liquid crystals as optical shutters, which control the amount of light passing through the thin display screen, creating vivid, life-like colors. LCDs are commonly used on microwaves, calculators and computers, as well as projection (up to 60") and direct view (10"-30") TVs. Plasma displays use a complex gas-based system. The benefits are a vivid, bright, clear picture with a slim form factor that can be mounted on a wall or on a pedestal. Plasma TVs range from 42 inches to 63 inches.


Screen Size
Diagonal Screen Size is the size of your TV screen, measured diagonally in inches.


Digital TV Standard
Digital TV Standard refers to the way in which your television receives and displays signals. Here is a guide:

Analog - Analog is not a digital format. It is the traditional display type that uses the NTSC system and is what we have been watching for years. Analog televisions have an almost square screen (4:3 aspect ratio) and are unable to display HDTV signals. Because the federal government has mandated that broadcasters begin switching from analog to digital television signals, manufacturers have begun producing televisions that are capable of displaying the new digital format. In the future, analog TVs will only be able to receive digital signals with the addition of a receiver that will decode digital signals.

HDTV Monitor - HDTV refers to "High Definition Television," which is the highest quality of digital television available. HDTV Monitors are also known as "HDTV-Ready" or "HDTV-Capable" TVs. With the addition of a separate receiver, these televisions can display high definition signals (1080i, 720p, etc.) that result in images that are many times clearer and more detailed than those from analog televisions, as well Dolby Digital Sound. HDTV is displayed using an aspect ratio of 16:9, or "widescreen." The separate receivers may also be referred to as set-top boxes, digital decoders or digital tuners. These sets are usually less expensive than sets that have the receiver integrated with the television.

EDTV Monitors - EDTV refers to Enhanced Definition Television, which provides lower image quality than HDTV, but still higher quality than a standard digital (SDTV) signal. EDTV Monitors are also known as EDTV-Ready" or "EDTV-Capable" TVs. With the addition of a separate receiver, these televisions can display enhanced definition signals (at least 480p) that result in images that are clearer and more detailed than those from analog televisions, as well as Dolby Digital Sound. EDTV may use an aspect ratio of either 16:9 (widescreen) or 4:3 (square-shaped; same shape as analog television). The separate receivers may also be referred to as set-top boxes, digital decoders or digital tuners. These sets are usually less expensive than sets that have the receiver integrated with the television.

HDTV - HDTVs have built-in digital receivers/decoders and do not require the purchase of any separate components in order to display digital signals. They may also be referred to as an "integrated set" or "HDTV built-in." These televisions can display high definition signals (1080i, 720p, etc.) that result in images that are many times clearer and more detailed than those from analog televisions, as well Dolby Digital Sound. HDTV is displayed using an aspect ratio of 16:9, or "widescreen."

EDTV - EDTV refers to Enhanced Definition Television, which provides lower image quality than HDTV, but still higher quality than a standard digital (SDTV) signal. EDTVs have built-in digital receivers/decoders and do not require the purchase of any separate components in order to display digital signals. They may also be referred to as an "integrated set" or "EDTV built-in." These televisions can display enhanced definition signals (at least 480p) that result in images that are clearer and more detailed than those from analog televisions, as well as Dolby Digital Sound. EDTV may use an aspect ratio of either 16:9 (widescreen) or 4:3 (square-shaped; same shape as analog television).

SDTV - SDTVs have built-in digital receivers/decoders and do not require the purchase of any separate components in order to display digital signals. SDTV refers to "Standard Definition Television," which provides lower image quality than EDTV or HDTV, but higher image quality than analog TV. SDTV is displayed using an aspect ratio of 4:3, the same square shape as analog television.

Display Resolution
Display Resolution measures picture quality in pixels. The more pixels a television can display, the sharper the image. More pixels also provide higher-quality color.

What's on tomorrow? Product Features (Part 2)
Highlights:
Display Format, Built-in Tuner, Aspect Ratio, etc.